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Symptoms
The most common symptoms of coronavirus (COVID-19) are recent onset of:
  • New continuous cough and/or
  • High temperature
  • loss or change to your sense of smell or taste  

For most people, coronavirus (COVID-19) will be a mild illness If you have coronavirus symptoms:
  • Do not go to a GP surgery, pharmacy or hospital
  • You do not need to contact 111 to tell them you're staying at home
  • Testing for coronavirus is not needed if you're staying at home
  • Plan ahead and ask others for help to ensure that you can successfully stay at home and consider what can be done for vulnerable people in the household
  • Ask your employer, friends and family to help you to get the things you need to stay at home
  • Wash your hands regularly for 20 seconds, each time using soap and water, or use hand sanitiser
  • If you feel you cannot cope with your symptoms at home, or your condition gets worse, or your symptoms do not get better after 7 days, then use the NHS 111 online coronavirus service. If you do not have internet access, call NHS 111. For a medical emergency dial 999
  • Visit NHS 111 Online for more information

Stay at Home
  • If you live alone and you have symptoms of coronavirus illness (COVID-19), however mild, stay at home for 7 days from when your symptoms started. (See ending isolation section below for more information)
  • If you live with others and you or one of them have symptoms of coronavirus, then all household members must stay at home and not leave the house for 14 days. The 14-day period starts from the day when the first person in the house became ill
  • It is likely that people living within a household will infect each other or be infected already. Staying at home for 14 days will greatly reduce the overall amount of infection the household could pass on to others in the community
  • For anyone in the household who starts displaying symptoms, they need to stay at home for 7 days from when the symptoms appeared, regardless of what day they are on in the original 14 day isolation period. (See ending isolation section below for more information
  • If you can, move any vulnerable individuals (such as the elderly and those with underlying health conditions) out of your home, to stay with friends or family for the duration of the home isolation period
  • If you cannot move vulnerable people out of your home, stay away from them as much as possible
Find out more about UK Gov Coronavirus Response
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What we have to say about your health and well being
2
May 2015
Parents in denial over children's weight
Childhood obesity has become a growing problem in this country during the last few decades. And now, experts believe part of that problem is so few parents recognise when their child is overweight or obese. In a study published in the British Journal of General Practice, researchers have revealed that out of the parents of nearly 3,000 children, only four described their child as being very overweight or obese. In reality, however, 369 of those children were officially identified as being very overweight according to medical definitions. Since being overweight during childhood puts you at a greater risk of developing health problems when you’re older, the fact that so many parents underestimate their children’s weight could have serious implications for the future. “If parents are unable to accurately classify their own child’s weight, they may not be willing or motivated to enact the changes to the child’s environment that promote healthy weight maintenance,” says Dr Sanjay Kinra of the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, one of the report’s authors. The research team gave questionnaires to the parents asking whether they would classify their child as very overweight (obese), overweight, healthy weight or underweight. By analysing their answers, the experts revealed 31 percent of the parents didn’t realise their child had a weight problem. Only those whose children were extremely obese were able to recognise their overweight status accurately. As a result of their findings, the researchers go so far as suggesting that obesity has become the new normal in today’s society. “Measures that decrease the gap between parental perceptions of child weight status and obesity scales used by medical professionals may now be needed in order to help parents better understand the health risks associated with overweight and increase uptake of healthier lifestyles,” says Professor Russell Viner of the UCL institute of Child Health, who co-wrote the report. So what should you do if you suspect your child’s weight may not be as healthy as it should be? First, find out what your child’s body mass index (BMI) is by using our BMI Healthy Weight Calculator. This will give you a good idea of whether or not your child has a weight problem and give you some practical advice. It’s also a good idea to get your child weighed and measured by health professional. You can take them to their GP or pop in to one of many local pharmacies around the country that can weigh, measure and determine your child’s BMI. Your pharmacist can also offer lots of advice on keeping your family’s weight healthy and refer you to your GP, if necessary. Meanwhile, for more information on feeding children a balanced diet, read our article Healthy eating for kids. A combination of factors need to be addressed including children staying indoors for long periods of time watching television or spending significant time in front of computers , tablet devices and video consoles . Snacking on high calorie foods and sugary drinks, not eating enough ( or in some cases any ) fresh fruit and vegetables . Not getting involved in physical exercise and sport will all impact on development and impact on weight and long term health. If we can support parents in getting good health messages to the next generation then this can have a profound impact on the wellbeing of our children in the years to come Childhood obesity has become a growing problem in this country during the last few decades. And now, experts believe part of that problem is so few parents recognise when their child is overweight or obese. In a study published in the British Journal of General Practice, researchers have revealed that out of the parents of nearly 3,000 children, only four described their child as being very overweight or obese. In reality, however, 369 of those children were officially identified as being very overweight according to medical definitions.Since being overweight during childhood puts you at a greater risk of developing health problems when you’re older, the fact that so many parents underestimate their children’s weight could have serious implications for the future.“If parents are unable to accurately classify their own child’s weight, they may not be willing or motivated to enact the changes to the child’s environment that promote healthy weight maintenance,” says Dr Sanjay Kinra of the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, one of the report’s authors.The research team gave questionnaires to the parents asking whether they would classify their child as very overweight (obese), overweight, healthy weight or underweight. By analysing their answers, the experts revealed 31 percent of the parents didn’t realise their child had a weight problem. Only those whose children were extremely obese were able to recognise their overweight status accurately.As a result of their findings, the researchers go so far as suggesting that obesity has become the new normal in today’s society.“Measures that decrease the gap between parental perceptions of child weight status and obesity scales used by medical professionals may now be needed in order to help parents better understand the health risks associated with overweight and increase uptake of healthier lifestyles,” says Professor Russell Viner of the UCL institute of Child Health, who co-wrote the report.So what should you do if you suspect your child’s weight may not be as healthy as it should be? First, find out what your child’s body mass index (BMI) is by using our BMI Healthy Weight Calculator. This will give you a good idea of whether or not your child has a weight problem and give you some practical advice.It’s also a good idea to get your child weighed and measured by health professional. You can take them to their GP or pop in to one of many local pharmacies around the country that can weigh, measure and determine your child’s BMI. Your pharmacist can also offer lots of advice on keeping your family’s weight healthy and refer you to your GP, if necessary.Meanwhile, for more information on feeding children a balanced diet, read our article Healthy eating for kids.A combination of factors need to be addressed including children staying indoors for long periods of time watching television or spending significant time in front of computers , tablet devices and video consoles .Snacking on high calorie foods and sugary drinks, not eating enough ( or in some cases any ) fresh fruit and vegetables .Not getting involved in physical exercise and sport will all impact on development and impact on weight and long term health.If we can support parents in getting good health messages to the next generation then this can have a profound impact on the wellbeing of our children in the years to come.
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